Teresa Escrig

News and oppinion about Cognitive AI & Robotics

Archive for February, 2013

Human aspect robots can either by repulsive or the base for cute service robots

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A new android infant has been born thanks to the University of California San Diego’s Machine Perception Lab. The lab received funding from the National Science Foundation to contract Kokoro Co. Ltd. and Hanson Robotics, two companies that specialize in building lifelike animatronics and androids, to build a replicant based on a one year old baby. The resulting robot, which has been a couple of years in development, has finally been completed – and you can watch it smile and make cute faces.

With high definition cameras in the eyes, Diego San sees people, gestures, expressions, and uses AI modeled on human babies, to learn from people, the way that a baby hypothetically would. The facial expressions are important to establish a relationship, and communicate intuitively to people. As much a work of art as technology and science, this represents a step forward in the development of emotionally relevant robotics, building on previous work of David Hanson with the Machine Perception Lab such as the emotionally responsive Einstein shown at TED in 2009 (here another video).

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In 1970, the robotics professor Masahiro Mori coined the term uncanny valley, a hypothesis in the field of robotics and 3D computer animation, which holds that when human replicas look and act almost, but not perfectly, like actual human beings, it causes a response of revulsion among human observers. The “valley” refers to the dip in a graph of the comfort level of humans as a function of a robot‘s human likeness. The hypothesis has been linked to Ernst Jentsch‘s concept of “the uncanny” identified in a 1906 essay, “On the Psychology of the Uncanny” Jentsch’s conception was elaborated by Sigmund Freud in a 1919 essay entitled “The Uncanny” (“Das Unheimliche“).

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What I would say is that basic research is done to be used in a myriad of ways, so that can serve humans best.

And certainly this very advanced research in robotic expressions can help us to be closer to something as cute as Gumdrop, the 27-year old Bulgarian robot-actress.

 

Many robotic prototypes built, few arrive to the market

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I really enjoyed  the following video from iRobot that shows their museum of all of the robotic prototypes and applications they’ve been working on over the years.

It’s amazing stuff, and very important to realize the amount of work that needs to be done to prove a concept. Even when proven, the robot may not meet some of the needs of the user, and not a best seller anyway.

Next time you buy a sophisticated toy or a small (not so intelligent) vacuum cleaner, remember all of the time, money, research and work behind it!

Thank you iRobot for showing us this treasure!

Written by Teresa Escrig

February 11th, 2013 at 11:33 pm

What are the benefits of Artificial Intelligence in Robotics?

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Happy New Year to all!  It’s been a while since my last post. Too busy. Now, I’m back.

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Robotics is not only a research field within artificial intelligence, but a field of application, one where all areas of artificial intelligence can be tested and integrated into a final result.

Amazing humanoid robots exhibit elegant and smooth motion capable of walking, running, and going up and down stairs.  They use their hands to protect themselves when falling, and to get up afterward.  They’re an example of the tremendous financial and human capital that is being devoted to research and development in the field of electronics, control and the design of robots.

Very often, the behavior of these robots contains a fixed number of pre-programmed instructions that are repeated regardless of  any changes in the environment. These robots have no autonomy, nor adaptation, to the changing environment, and therefore do not show intelligent behavior. We are amazed by the technology they provide, which is fantastic! But we can not infer that, because the robots are physically so realistic and the movements so precise and gentle, that they are able to do what we (people) do. Read the rest of this entry »