Teresa Escrig

News and oppinion about Cognitive AI & Robotics

Archive for the ‘c-robots.com’ tag

Sasuke and Love, two robot nurses to help caregivers with their job

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ROBOHELPER SASUKE, a robot lifter,  and ROBOHELPER LOVE, a bodily waste removal system, are two devices created to help caregivers in their daily tasks. They were designed with the help of Toshiyuki Kita, who is known for creating the look of Sharp’s AQUOS TVs and Mitsubishi’s failed yellow household robot Wakamaru.

ROBOHELPER SASUKE helps lift a person into and out of bed using servo motors. The device has two rods connected by a sling that slides under the body. The sling is made of a special material and can accommodate a weight of 264 lbs (120 kg). Furthermore the arms can rotate up to 60 degrees, which allows the patient to comfortably transfer from a prone position to a sitting position.

ROBOHELPER LOVE – is an an automatic bodily waste disposal unit aimed at making bedpans a thing of the past. A cup wraps around the patient’s waist, fitted with sensors that automatically detect the presence of fluid and/or stool. The waste is quickly suctioned away into a holding tank, followed by a cleansing wash using room temperature water. The cup itself can be washed and sterilized automatically at the station. It can operate for up to 12 hours without supervision, making it ideal for overnight use.

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Written by Teresa Escrig

October 2nd, 2012 at 6:39 pm

Shoal, the robo-fish that monitors oxygen levels and salinity of waters north of Spain

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By , October 1, 2012

A five foot long (1.5 meter) robo-fish prototype that monitors oxygen levels and salinity is currently being tested in waters north of Spain as part of the EU-funded Shoal Consortium project.

The idea is to have real-time monitoring of pollution, so that if someone is dumping chemicals or something is leaking, it can be detected straight away, find out what is causing the problem and put a stop to it.

Traditional robots use propellers or thrusters for propulsion, however Shoal robot-fish uses the fin of a fish to propel itself through the water.

The Shoal robot-fish costs US$32,000, and it operates for just eight hours before needing to be charged. However, there’s no doubt that if this problem can be overcome (with, perhaps, some sort of underwater charging station) the robo-fish will find homes in coastal waters around the world.

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FURO – the new service robot from Future Robot who mimics human expressions

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FUROs, the new service robot from Korean robotics startup Future Robot can be defined as a hybrid between a smartphone and a smart machine.

According to Korea IT Times, the FURO interactive robot can provide a variety of services “by reading users’ intentions in different situations” by observing users’ movement, face and voice, and then conveying the “matched dialogue, facial expression, movement and necessary information.”

One buyer from Brazil, who ordered over 100 FUROs, came up with new business model – mobile (moving) advertisements. As FURO moves around in airports or exhibitions, they said, the back screens which are remotely operated can be utilized for advertisements while the front screen performs ordinary information services.

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Written by Teresa Escrig

September 28th, 2012 at 9:00 pm

Robohub -news, views & everything robotic- launches its beta version

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Robohub launches its beta version and will start publicizing it September 26 at 9am EDT.

Robohub main focus is to provide high-quality information about robotics to the general public.

I am proud to announce that I am contributing to this organization with this blog.

Written by Teresa Escrig

September 27th, 2012 at 6:58 pm

AISOY1 II, a programmable inexpensive robot with emotions

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By , September 19, 2012

Spanish start-up Aisoy Robotics is marketing a new robot that, while it may look similar to the famous Furby, is actually a fully programmable research and development platform.

The Aisoy1 II robot comes with a variety of sensors (touch, light, position, temperature, and camera), microphone and speaker, RGB LEDs in its body, and a 70 mini-LED matrix display (for animated lips). Four servos control the robot’s neck rotation, eyelids, and eyebrows. The platform doesn’t move.

The package includes a dialogue system for speech recognition and synthesis, as well as computer vision software for stuff like face and object recognition, all running on the Linux operating system. The company claims even complete novices can take advantage of these functions without having to learn how to code thanks to DIA, its visual programming tool. The program runs in HTML5 compatible browsers, allowing you to select nodes that control the robot’s various sensors and behaviors.

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Aisoy 1 II includes a dialogue system for speech recognition and synthesis, as well as com...As the Thymio II, a specific non-standard programming language is against the robotic community efforts for standardization. However, the fact that is HTML5 compatible contributes to the creation of the Robotics App Economy.

The most important feature of Aisoy1 II, which is not mentioned in the previous article, is its emotional motor, a very interesting AI feature at the service of developers for a very low price. As their creators said: ” humans would not take decisions without emotions”. This emotional motor can be a key factor for development of the robotic industry.

Very cute little and inexpensive robots that can help to promote robotics education at schools and colleges.

Thymio II, a new educational robot with a non-standard language programming

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Very nice promotional video of Thymio II, the new educational robotic platform from the Swiss research institute EPFL (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology).

Thymio II is a new educational robot designed by Swiss research institute EPFLThymio II is available now, at a price of 99 Swiss francs (US$106).

Wheels can  be connected to user-supplied moving parts such as arms, propellers, winches, or just about anything else.

It also features a microphone and speaker, a 3-axis accelerometer, five proximity sensors, two ground sensors, a temperature sensor, and 39 LEDs which allow its body to illuminate in different colors.

It can accept programming via a USB connection (which is also used to charge its lithium-polymer battery) or a memory card slot. Programming is created using EPFL’s robotics-specific ASEBA language. This is a drawback considering the robotic community efforts for standardization with the Robotics Operating System (ROS).

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The new Toyota’s Human Support Robot (HSR) is able to change size of body and arm

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Toyota's Human Support Robot

By . September 22, 2012

Toyota has unveiled a new assistant robot designed to help the disabled live more independently. Called the Human Support Robot (HSR), it represents the latest initiative in Toyota’s Partner Robot program and is intended to help out around the home by fetching things, opening curtains, and picking up objects that have fallen to the floor.

The HSR can be controlled using a simple graphical user interface via tablet PC. HSR has also an arm of 2.5 feet length and gripper. When not in use, the robot’s single arm is designed to fold in tightly to reduce its body’s overall diameter to just 14.5 inches

The robot has a telescopic body, which gives it a height of 2.7 to 4.3 feet.

The robot appears to have both a Prosense (Microsoft Kinect) sensor and stereo cameras in its head, which would allow it to sense depth and visually identify people and objects.

Expected price of the robot is unknown, but given that Japanese public health insurance will cover 90% of associated costs (a law designed specifically for robot technology that was passed recently), it seems HSR will have a decent shot at becoming a real consumer product, though it may take another couple of years of development.

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Human-Computer (or Robot) interface through Rough Sketches

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A team from Rhode Island’s Brown University and the Technical University of Berlin have created software that analyzes users’ crude, cartoony sketches, and figures out what it is that they’re trying to draw.

To develop the system, the researchers started with a database made up of 250 categories of annotated photographs. Then, using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk crowd-sourcing service, they hired people to make rough sketches of objects from each of those categories. The resulting 20,000 sketches were then subjected to recognition and machine learning algorithms, in order to teach the system what general sort of sketches could be attributed to which categories. After seeing numerous examples of how various people drew a rabbit, for instance, it would learn that combinations of specific shapes usually meant “rabbit.”

Check out the video showing the performance of the application. It is amazing! This technology has a broad and very deep implication in many areas, robotics is just one.

The research  is  available online, together with a library of sample sketches, and other materials. The team is currently considering a ‘Pictionary’ type open source game to expand the systems’ drawing reference library.

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Robots Bring Jobs Back to the US

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The rise of robotic automation in the manufacturing and packaging industry is often blamed for the steep job losses in U.S. manufacturing, along with the rampant outsourcing of labor to cheaper workforces. But a real look at the facts and stats show that things just aren’t that cut and dry.

Check out our infographic below and you’ll see the many ways in which robotics and the reshoring initiative can help increase manufacturing employment in the U.S. From providing improved safety measures in dangerous jobs, to introducing higher-paying, specialized positions that workers can be trained to fill, to laying out the true pros and cons of offshore outsourcing, this infographic sheds some light on the “other side” of the story.


Robots And Automation Bring Jobs Back To The U.S.

Written by Teresa Escrig

September 17th, 2012 at 11:38 pm

Towards the Robot Apps revolution: Controlling a small robot from a Windows 8 App

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I love examples of how to do things. We learn so much from examples!

In this case the example shows both how you can use C# skills to build robots, and also how flexible the new Windows Store app model is when it comes to communicating with remote devices.

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