Teresa Escrig

News and oppinion about Cognitive AI & Robotics

Archive for the ‘Cognitive Brain’ tag

How would your life be enhanced by wearing a virtual personal assistant?

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Poster of the movie "Her"

Poster of the movie “Her”

I love comparing the intelligence of a device that appears in a movie with the reality of AI.  It can give us a visual glimpse of a very real possibility.

What do you think? Would you like to have a (wearable) virtual personal assistant helping you to make informed decisions? I certainly would. The human race could take a huge leap in evolution with such extended intelligence capabilities.

The movie ‘Her’ is a beautiful example of just that: Below is an excellent article with a very deep analysis of current and near future AI results.  It’s a great read, I’d love to hear your thoughts. Please, leave comments.

Can we Build “Her”?: What Samantha tells Us About the Future of AI

By Vlad Sejnoha, Nuance

What will the next generation of intelligent computing look like?

The movie Her has captured the public imagination with its vision of a lightning-fast evolutionary trajectory of virtual assistants, and the emotional bonds we could form with them. Is this a likely future?

The film’s narrative arc shows the evolution of the Samantha operating system and her relationship with her user, Theodore, transforming from a competent assistant, to a literary agent that proactively arranges the publication of Theodore’s letters, to an ideal girlfriend, and ultimately to an entity that loses interest in humans because they have become unsatisfying companions. Throughout, Samantha is an impressive conversationalist with a perfect command of language, a grasp of the broader context, a grounding in common sense, and a mastery of the emotional realm.

Continue reading…

Crucial Technology for AI and Robotics: a Kinect-like sensor is included in a smart-phone

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3D model of reality created in TANGO project at Google.

3D model of reality created in project Tango at Google.

The Kinect sensor was a revolution for the Robotics industry, mainly because it was a relatively inexpensive way to have a 3D obstacle detection. It provided a set of distances from where the Kinect was positioned to the objects of the world.

The person responsible at Microsoft for the development of the Kinect sensor is now in charge of Project Tango at Google. Project Tango  integrates a Kinect-like sensor in a smart-phone (with all the others sensors already included in the smart-phone), providing a 3D model of reality. Crucial technology for AI and Robotics.

And also, can you imagine having instant access to wearable extended virtual reality? Instant access to the structure of the world in front of you – imagine where this road goes? What is the structure of this building? Or even – Show me where I can buy my favorite pair of jeans in this shopping mall?

And even further: Create a 3D model of your body, use it to virtually try on different clothes online (also in a 3D model), check out the look and fit, make a purchasing decision, drop it into a shopping card, and have it delivered to your door

Mmmm…my imagination flies. Love to hear where yours goes… Leave comments.

Here is the article (check out the amazing video):

Google announces Project Tango smartphone with Kinect-like 3D imaging sensors [VIDEO]

by Chris Chavez

Google was able to throw everyone a curve ball today with the announcement of Project Tango, their new in-house smartphone prototype outfitted with Kinect-like sensors.

The 5-inch smartphone as is being developed by Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects group (ATAP) the same people behind Project Ara. Project Tango is lead by Johnny Lee — a man who helped make the Microsoft Kinect possible (makes sense, right?). The goal of Project Tango is to ultimately give mobile devices a “human-scale understanding” of space and motion, allowing users to map the world around them in ways they never thought possible.

Continue reading…

 

Google has given an early prototype of the device to Matterport, which makes computer vision and perceptual computing solutions, like software that maps and creates 3D reconstructions of indoor spaces. Don’t miss the video of the 3D map result in this link! It’s amazing!

 

Autonomous scrubber machines: is the market ready for them?

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11.19.12Cognitive Robots’ first product was the incorporation of our Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics (R) into commercial scrubber machines. This allows any existing commercial scrubber machine to be easily transformed into an autonomous and intelligent robot, that cleans floors, without the need of a human operator.

Did you know that, the operator of a scrubber machine has to follow the same path/pattern every single time they clean an area? It’s true, because otherwise people would be able to perceive the lines of movement of the scrubber on the floors, which are not considered aesthetically pleasing. The main corridors of an airport or a supermarket need to be cleaned longitudinally.

This job is so boring that industrial scrubber machines are increasingly being destroyed by the operators earlier and earlier. Therefore, scrubber manufacturers have changed their machines to be cheaper and with less electronics, resulting in lower life expectancy for their product.  The downside of this, is that in the long-term, due to replacement costs, end-user’s will spend more money to service their clients.

We are now in the midst of a global debate that is exploring the question, “Are robots taking jobs away or providing jobs for people?”  In the current economic climate, we need to decide if we want to maintain the status quo to protect low-profile jobs; or embrace advances that allow us to become more competitive and effective in our jobs, promote learning new skills, and provide jobs where human creativity and intelligence are necessary.

What do we want?

Here it is the specification sheet of the autonomous scrubber machine that Cognitive Robots can provide: specification sheet scrubber machines

Is this product good enough to solve the problem of automatic cleaning?

Is the market ready for this?  What do you think?

How I fell in love with Robotics?

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International Women’s Day.

I received my PhD in Artificial Intelligence, in particular on cognitive models to simulate the way people think about space and time, to effectively move daily around their environment, without the use of any measurement tools. I applied those theoretical models to the movement of simulated robots through the streets of my hometown, Castellon, Spain. It was quite a theoretical thesis, and I really enjoyed working on it.

MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAAfter I finished my PhD thesis, I went to a IJCAI (International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence) conference in Japan to present my research. The Robocup competition was going on at the same venue as the conference. For the first time, Sony was there presenting their cat and dog robot pets in a fiberglass showcase. The movements of those little robots were so well done, that I stood there looking at them in amazement for a very long time. I thought, “I want to be working with these robots”, “I want to include the technology that I just developed for my thesis to these robots”, “the best way for the robots to move through their environment is by using cognitive models, and I am going to make this happen”! Read the rest of this entry »

What are the benefits of Artificial Intelligence in Robotics?

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Happy New Year to all!  It’s been a while since my last post. Too busy. Now, I’m back.

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Robotics is not only a research field within artificial intelligence, but a field of application, one where all areas of artificial intelligence can be tested and integrated into a final result.

Amazing humanoid robots exhibit elegant and smooth motion capable of walking, running, and going up and down stairs.  They use their hands to protect themselves when falling, and to get up afterward.  They’re an example of the tremendous financial and human capital that is being devoted to research and development in the field of electronics, control and the design of robots.

Very often, the behavior of these robots contains a fixed number of pre-programmed instructions that are repeated regardless of  any changes in the environment. These robots have no autonomy, nor adaptation, to the changing environment, and therefore do not show intelligent behavior. We are amazed by the technology they provide, which is fantastic! But we can not infer that, because the robots are physically so realistic and the movements so precise and gentle, that they are able to do what we (people) do. Read the rest of this entry »

Amazing examples of the variety of uses of service robotics

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By Ann R. Thryft 11/12/2012

Service robots often mean robots that assist the elderly, or help with the rehabilitation of medical patients. But the range of services that robots can perform is extremely broad.

From a robotic fish that uses artificial intelligence to detect and identify pollution in seawater created by SHOAL,

 

 

 

 

 

 

To a telepresence PatrolBot which will let disabled police officers and military veterans serve as distance patrol officers, filling a gap in both the lack of patrol staff, and the lack of available jobs for disabled vets and officers, developed by Florida International University. Read the rest of this entry »

Fiona, a community robotic project to create an artificial mind

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Adele Robotics has launched Fiona, a project for the robotics community to create an artificial mind.

This is another example of Cloud Robotics and reproducing the Apps economy for the robotics industry, the future of robotics.

Congratulations Adele!

Robotic Operating System (ROS), the standard that the robotics field desperately needed

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October 19, 2012 by David Pietrocola at Robohub (Robohub is an online platform that brings together leading communicators in robotics research, start-ups, business, and education from around the world).

Open-source software is making it easier to reuse algorithms and allow engineers and researchers to focus on their problems of interest instead of reinventing the wheel for each project. Not an expert in path planning or don’t have the time (or patience) to implement SLAM? There’s a package for that. Manipulator control? Package for that too. Additionally, falling component prices and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices are making robotics hardware more available. This tutorial will teach you how to put together a simple remote teleoperation robot using these principles.

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Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics (R) from Cognitive Robots is created with ROS.

Will elderly embrace robot health care?

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By THOMAS ROGERS, 08/20/2012

“Full robots with arms are still very expensive,” says Ashutosh Saxena, a professor in the department of computer science at Cornell, “but they are getting cheaper by the day.” He predicts that armless robots — capable of communicating verbally with the elderly and observing them in case of accidents — will hit the market within the next five years.

There’s just one hiccup: the elderly themselves.

Despite manufacturers’ hopes, robotic technology has proven to be alienating for many older people — even, the BBC reports, in Japan, a country with an intense, long-term love of all things robotic.

Alexander Libin, scientific director of simulation and education research at Medstar Health Research Institute, argues that one of the biggest challenges is that the elderly need to be able to communicate easily with them. Although many robots (and mobile phones) can now recognize voice commands, nonverbal cues pose a much bigger challenge. Libin, who has worked extensively on robot-patient interaction, believes that touch-sensitive technology — like the one used by Paro, the therapeutic seal robot — will play a large role in making robots palatable to seniors.

“The Japanese want robots to be like them,” says Libin, noting Japan’s long tradition of treating inanimate objects like living beings. In the United States, we’re more comfortable treating machines as machines. “We want things we can control.”

The path toward robot acceptance may also require  patience. Like other forms of social change, robot acceptance may simply require one generation to replace the previous one.

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SwRI launches ROS-Industrial Consortium

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San Antonio — August 15, 2012 — Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is launching a cooperative research consortium to accelerate the development of ROS-Industrial, an open-source extension of ROS focused on the needs of industrial users.

ROS, which stands for Robot Operating System, is an open-source project providing a common framework of libraries and tools for a wide range of applications, particularly for service and research robots. The ROS-Industrial Consortium (RIC) will enable the industrial robotics community to apply the advanced capabilities of ROS for industrial applications quickly and easily using a common platform, the ROS-Industrial open source software program. The consortium will conduct foundational, precompetitive research and code development at the direction of the membership. Test results, data, recommendations and analysis generated by RIC will create a competitive advantage for its members and will be protected from public disclosure for a period of time.

ROS-Industrial will create code quality standards indicative of an industrial software product, to include rating/tracking code quality metrics, multi-level testing and documentation.

RIC will have its first kickoff meeting in early 2013. Annual membership fees vary depending on the size and type of organization.

For more information about the ROS-Industrial Consortium, see ric.swri.org or contact Evans at paul.evans@swri.org or (210) 522-2994.

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Cognitive Robot has also adopted ROS to develop its Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics.