Teresa Escrig

News and oppinion about Cognitive AI & Robotics

Archive for the ‘Evolution’ tag

The rapidly evolving world of robotic technology

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June 25 (Bloomberg) — Stanford University’s Marina Gorbis discusses the rapidly evolving world of robotic technology and how humans will interact with them, and learn from them over the next five to ten years. She interviews with Adam Johnson on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg Rewind.” (Source: Bloomberg)

Marina Gorbis is the Executive Director of Institute for the Future.

Marina’s biography – During her tenture at IFTF, and previously with SRI International, Marina has worked with hundreds of organizations in business, education, government, and philanthropy, bringing a future perspective to improve innovation capacity, develop strategies, and design new products and services. A native of Odessa, Ukraine, Marina is particularly suited to see things from a global perspective. She has worked all over the world and feels equally at home in Silicon Valley, Europe, India, or Kazakhstan. Before becoming IFTF’s Executive Director in 2006, Marina created the Global Innovation Forum, a project comparing innovation strategies in different regions, and she founded Global Ethnographic Network (GEN), a multi-year ethnographic research program aimed at understanding daily lives of people in Brazil, Russia, India, China, and Silicon Valley. She also led IFTF’s Technology Horizons Program, focusing on interaction between technology and social organizations. She has been a guest blogger on BoingBoing.net and writes for IFTF and major media outlets. She is a frequent speaker on future organizational, technology, and social issues. Marina holds a Master’s Degree from the Graduate School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley.

The Future of Robotics: personal point of view

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The future of robotics is advancing towards the incorporation of increasing intelligence.

Intelligence includes, among other things, perception (interpreting the environment and extracting the most relevant information from it), reasoning (inferring new knowledge from the one we perceive, i.e. if we know that A implies B, and B implies C, then we can infer that A implies C), learning (as many people have pointed out in this thread already) and decision making to implement solutions to particular applications (such as security, companion, tele-presence robots, autonomous scrubber machines, vacuum cleaners, etc).

At Cognitive Robots, we have developed the first embryonic brain called “Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics” -CR-B100-, which integrates all these four aspects, in a patent pending software.

We have tested the “brain” in several “bodies” with excellent results.

Please, check this post for more information.

We are actively looking for partnerships and investment capital to bring our company Cognitive Robots to the next level.

If you know of a visionary mind with capital to invest, please, pass that person my email: mtescrig@c-robots.com

We are planning on going to crowdfunding resources like KickStarter and offering our own robotic platform (brain and body) for research and a smaller version for education. What are your thoughts on that?

Cognitive Robots enhances Kompai’s capabilities by incorporating its “Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics”

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Since February 2011, Cognitive Robots and Robosoft have been collaborating on the framework of a European project, the ECHORD C-Kompai. The objective of the project is to enhance the companion robot Kompai with the cognitive capabilities provided by the “Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics ®” – CR-B100 – of Cognitive Robots.

The intent behind the improvement of the Kompai platform is to better serve the users – the elderly.

We have identified 3 aspects of the Kompai’s functionality to be improved in this project:

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World Economic Forum lists top 10 emerging technologies for 2012

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The World Economic Forum‘s (WEF’s) Global Agenda Council on Emerging Technologies has compiled a list of the top 10 emerging technologies it believes will have the greatest impact on the state of the world in 2012, in order from lowest to highest in terms of the potential to provide solutions to global challenges.

1. Informatics for adding value to information
2. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering
3. Green Revolution 2.0 – technologies for increased food and biomass
4. Nanoscale design of materials
5. Systems biology and computational modelling/simulation of chemical and biological systems
6. Utilization of carbon dioxide as a resource
7. Wireless power
8. High energy density power systems
9. Personalized medicine, nutrition and disease prevention
10. Enhanced education technology

The greatest impact on the world is provided by processing the information available to humans. The quantity of information now available to individuals and organizations is unprecedented in human history, and the rate of information generation continues to grow exponentially. Yet, the sheer volume of information is in danger of creating more noise than value, and as a result limiting its effective use. Innovations in how information is organized, mined and processed hold the key to filtering out the noise and using the growing wealth of global information to address emerging challenges.

Artificial Intelligence and in particular Qualitative Models, which extract the most relevant information, are pieces of the solution. This is the key technology included in the “Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics” of Cognitive Robots, a very broad technology, which not only can be used for service robotics but for Internet application as well. The basics of our work are included in this book.

By February 15, 2012

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Autonomous road train project

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The sucessfull results of the  SARTRE (Safe Road Trains for the Environment) project represents the beginning of a new era where the organized chaos of individual drivers can be blunted by an autonomous “follow-the-leader” approach that has clear benefits: As well as freeing up the driver from the hassle of actually controlling the vehicle, the  project promises benefits in terms of safety, congestion (meaning faster travel times) and fuel consumption, which could be reduced by as much as 20 percent on the highway.

By , May 28, 2012

Part-funded by the European Commission, SARTRE is a joint venture between Ricardo UK Ltd, Applus Idiada, Robotiker, Institut für Kraftfahrzeuge Aachen (IKA), SP Technical Research Institute, Volvo Technology and Volvo Car Corporation. It works by using a high-tech suite of cameras, radar and laser sensors to enable a wirelessly linked “platoon” of cars to travel autonomously in a road train behind a lead vehicle operated by a professional driver.

The project started in 2009 and the technology was successfully demonstrated at the Volvo Proving Ground near Gothenburg, Sweden, back in 2010. In the latest milestone, the SARTRE platoon took to the motorways of Spain amidst other road users in a journey that saw a Volvo XC60, a Volvo V60, a Volvo S60 and one truck drive automatically behind the lead vehicle at 85 km/h (53 mph) separated by a distance of as little as five meters (16.4 feet). Using Ricardo’s autonomous control system, each of the vehicles was able to accelerate, brake and turn in exactly the same fashion as the lead vehicle.

“People think that autonomous driving is science fiction, but the fact is that the technology is already here,” says Linda Wahlström, project manager for the SARTRE project at Volvo Car Corporation.

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Google moves closer to becoming an Artificial Intelligence Engine

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Are we going to see improvements in our internet search soon?

I was thinking that Google couldn’t change or improve because it was so big, well-established and essentially a monopoly. Perhaps it still can offer new solutions…

by , Thursday, May 17, 2012

Google began rolling out a feature that gives searchers in the United States the potential to access more relevant and in-depth responses to answers without leaving the page. The concept is built on something the company calls “knowledge graph,” which ties together words to create relationships.

There are a multitude of sources behind this data. The search results page displays a variety of content related to keyword queries, bringing up a list of facts, photos, and landmarks, as well as quick links to other popular uses for the search term. Think of a Web beneath the user interface layer of the Internet that ties together all information across the Web.

Rob Garner, vice president of strategy at agency iCrossing, said Google’s knowledge graph takes another step in the company’s long transition to develop an artificial intelligence engine — semantic search. “It’s something Google’s doing in parallel to Schema.org in terms of relating object, places and people,” he said. “Looking at the schema for a person you can actually define the relationship with other people using schema vocabulary.”

For example, someone looking for information on Marie Curie will see her birth and death dates, but also details on her education and scientific discoveries. The search engine understands much more…

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We need Service Robots to feed disable students

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Dear Teresa, My name is Paul Doyle and I am Head of Access R&D at Hereward College in Coventry. Hereward is a residential college that supports disabled students. We have for some years developed a keen interest in the use of robotics as an assistive technology.

I have been in contact with many providers of robots over the years from the PR2 at Willow Garage to the Care-o-bot by Fraunhofer with little tangible progress. What we have failed to achieve to date is to embed and evaluate an actual device in a real care/living/education environment such as Hereward to see if it actually works and if it is financially viable!

I would like to challenge any robot for example to help with the scenario I posted recently on a Linkedin forum:

Today when I was having lunch in our refectory I observed a number of students (with a variety of physical disabilities) waiting in an orderly queue for a human career to help feed them their lunchtime meal. Due to a shortage of careers some of the students waited for a very long time before a staff member could ask what the student wanted from the menu, picked up the chosen meal from the counter and then fed the student in an appropriate manner (food at the right temperature consistency and rate).
This situation led me to ponder the questions could a robot have helped carry out these tasks to some degree, and bearing in mind the care staff are paid not much over minimum wage, when (if ever) will a robot alternative be a financially viable?”

I would hope manufacturers could see this exposure to a group of users as a development resource, as we have a residential care and education setting where such technologies can be tested in a managed and safe environment.

Many of the young people at Hereward will eventually be the recipients of assistive robot technologies if and when they come online, so hearing what they need/want would I imagine provide a useful insight to product developers.

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The Intelligence Revolution: Visions of the Future

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Dr. Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist, best-selling author, and popularizer of science. He’s the co-founder of string field theory (a branch of string theory), and continues Einstein’s search to unite the four fundamental forces of nature into one unified theory.

In this incredibly well done movie, he explains how Artificial Intelligence is affecting our lives now.  How our kids are spending more time in virtual worlds, such as “War of World Craft”,  than with their real friends. And how this will affect our lives in the near future.

It is an amazing review, of some of the scientific research that is taking place on the planet, related with Artificial Intelligence.

There is at least one thing that I do not agree with at all: that humans are going to have incorporated into their bodies more robotic parts than human parts in the near future.  To me, this final idea is nonsense.

Design of a robot for the elderly: aspect and functionalities

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If you were going to design a companion robot, what would it look like?

What would it need to do?

What would they call it?

How would it change the life of the elderly?

I asked those questions to my colleges at the LinkedIn groups related with Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.

I will be posting their answer here. Thank you very much for all your contributions!  Keep an eye to it…

by Elad Inbar (LinkedIn Group: IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (IEEE RAS))

Check out this new movie… I think it will gove you many answers.

http://singularityhub.com/2012/02/24/new-robot-and-frank-movie-looks-like-a-realistic-portrayal-of-the-not-too-distant-future/

I post the trailer below: Frank Langella and Liv Tyler on their Sundance hit ‘Robot and Frank,’ about an elderly man living with a home health aid robot. (March 23)

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How robots create jobs

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Service Robotics will ultimately create more highly skilled jobs – a good thing in an economy struggling to reinvent itself and a great way to spread the word that the ‘Service Robotics Revolution’ is here.

by Adil Shafi , President, ADVENOVATION, Inc.

Originally posted 04/04/2012 on Robotics Online

No army can stop an idea whose time has come ~ Victor Hugo

In 2011, the International Federation of Robotics commissioned a report on how robots create jobs. http://www.ifr.org/robots-create-jobs/. The findings report that, “One million industrial robots currently in operation have been directly responsible for the creation of close to three million jobs… A growth in robot use over the next five years will result in the creation of one million high quality jobs around the world.”

Further, the market research firm Metra Martech wrote, “In world terms three to five million jobs would not exist if automation and robotics had not been developed to enable cost effective production of millions of electronic products from Phones to PlayStations.” The report actually covers several markets in the automotive, electronics, food and beverage, plastics, chemicals and pharmaceutical industries and focuses on countries like Brazil, China, Germany, Japan, Republic of Korea and USA. The complete report is available at ifr.org .

Read more: http://roboticsonline.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/how-robots-create-jobs/