Teresa Escrig

News and oppinion about Cognitive AI & Robotics

Archive for the ‘intelligence’ tag

Cognitive Robots enhances Kompai’s capabilities by incorporating its “Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics”

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Since February 2011, Cognitive Robots and Robosoft have been collaborating on the framework of a European project, the ECHORD C-Kompai. The objective of the project is to enhance the companion robot Kompai with the cognitive capabilities provided by the “Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics ®” – CR-B100 – of Cognitive Robots.

The intent behind the improvement of the Kompai platform is to better serve the users – the elderly.

We have identified 3 aspects of the Kompai’s functionality to be improved in this project:

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Flying Robot running partner for solo joggers

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Another example of practical apps for robots: A research team from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology has modified a commercially-available quadrocopter and turned it into an autonomous, flying running partner for solo joggers.

Researchers from RMIT in Melbourne, Australia have developed a flying running companion called Joggobot. The system uses the built-in camera on a commercially-available Parrot AR Drone quadrocopter to track the position of a jogger, and fly a few feet out in front. While the current version has some serious limitations, there is huge potential for the development of a fully interactive training partner or coach in the very near future.

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Written by Teresa Escrig

June 12th, 2012 at 6:35 pm

Research at Stanford may lead to computers that understand humans

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A new trend has emerged in the past few years and has led to the development of technologies like Siri, iPhone’s “personal assistant.” It entails using mathematical tools, namely probability and statistics, to try and model how people use language to communicate in social situations. The work at Stanford builds directly on this branch of research.

Although statistics provide an initial solution to problems, in my opinion it is very primitive and has considerable limitations. It uses the brute force of the computer and no cognition. Other techniques, like qualitative models, have been demonstrated to be much more useful for extracting relevant information from any system, and then processing that information to make decisions. That is the technology being used in the “Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics (R)” of Cognitive Robots. You can find a link to my book that explains the basics here.

By , June 6, 2012

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Cognitive Robots’ corporate video

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Cognitive Robots has successfully developed the world’s first truly autonomous Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics®, the CR-B100. Our mission is to provide an integrated solution for the automation of service vehicles, using state of the art cognitive processes that mimic the human brain.

Our Cognitive Brain incorporates four aspects of human intelligence: perception (object recognition), reasoning, learning and decision-making. This advanced level of artificial intelligence enables adaptation when uncertainty and unknown situations occur.

We’re actively seeking technical partnerships and investment capital.

Here you can see our corporate video:

Current accomplishments and activities of Cognitive Robots include:

  • CR-B100 has been adapted to commercial floor scrubbers (beta state).
  • CR-B100 has been fully incorporated into a Pioneer (Adept) research platform to prove out the full capabilities of the brain.
  • CR-B100 is currently being incorporated into Robosoft’s companion robot Kompai to enhance the Kompai’s capabilities with intelligence. This allows it to perceive the landmarks in the environment, automatically create its own map, avoid obstacles in 3D, clean the home intelligently, and make decisions to engage the elderly.
  • Cognitive Robots is about to launch its own Service Robotics platform using the CR-B100.
  • Another product of Cognitive Robots, the CR-B50 – Manual Assisted Driver- has been successfully incorporated into commercial forklifts, to increase security.
  • CR-B50 is now being incorporated into commercial buses.

World Economic Forum lists top 10 emerging technologies for 2012

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The World Economic Forum‘s (WEF’s) Global Agenda Council on Emerging Technologies has compiled a list of the top 10 emerging technologies it believes will have the greatest impact on the state of the world in 2012, in order from lowest to highest in terms of the potential to provide solutions to global challenges.

1. Informatics for adding value to information
2. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering
3. Green Revolution 2.0 – technologies for increased food and biomass
4. Nanoscale design of materials
5. Systems biology and computational modelling/simulation of chemical and biological systems
6. Utilization of carbon dioxide as a resource
7. Wireless power
8. High energy density power systems
9. Personalized medicine, nutrition and disease prevention
10. Enhanced education technology

The greatest impact on the world is provided by processing the information available to humans. The quantity of information now available to individuals and organizations is unprecedented in human history, and the rate of information generation continues to grow exponentially. Yet, the sheer volume of information is in danger of creating more noise than value, and as a result limiting its effective use. Innovations in how information is organized, mined and processed hold the key to filtering out the noise and using the growing wealth of global information to address emerging challenges.

Artificial Intelligence and in particular Qualitative Models, which extract the most relevant information, are pieces of the solution. This is the key technology included in the “Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics” of Cognitive Robots, a very broad technology, which not only can be used for service robotics but for Internet application as well. The basics of our work are included in this book.

By February 15, 2012

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Autonomous road train project

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The sucessfull results of the  SARTRE (Safe Road Trains for the Environment) project represents the beginning of a new era where the organized chaos of individual drivers can be blunted by an autonomous “follow-the-leader” approach that has clear benefits: As well as freeing up the driver from the hassle of actually controlling the vehicle, the  project promises benefits in terms of safety, congestion (meaning faster travel times) and fuel consumption, which could be reduced by as much as 20 percent on the highway.

By , May 28, 2012

Part-funded by the European Commission, SARTRE is a joint venture between Ricardo UK Ltd, Applus Idiada, Robotiker, Institut für Kraftfahrzeuge Aachen (IKA), SP Technical Research Institute, Volvo Technology and Volvo Car Corporation. It works by using a high-tech suite of cameras, radar and laser sensors to enable a wirelessly linked “platoon” of cars to travel autonomously in a road train behind a lead vehicle operated by a professional driver.

The project started in 2009 and the technology was successfully demonstrated at the Volvo Proving Ground near Gothenburg, Sweden, back in 2010. In the latest milestone, the SARTRE platoon took to the motorways of Spain amidst other road users in a journey that saw a Volvo XC60, a Volvo V60, a Volvo S60 and one truck drive automatically behind the lead vehicle at 85 km/h (53 mph) separated by a distance of as little as five meters (16.4 feet). Using Ricardo’s autonomous control system, each of the vehicles was able to accelerate, brake and turn in exactly the same fashion as the lead vehicle.

“People think that autonomous driving is science fiction, but the fact is that the technology is already here,” says Linda Wahlström, project manager for the SARTRE project at Volvo Car Corporation.

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Intelligent goggles for partly-sighted people

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“Intelligent” goggles for partly-sighted people have been developed at Universidad Carlos III in Madrid, Spain. The system consists of a pair of stereoscopic digital cameras mounted on either side of a virtual reality headset, with two digital screens in front of the wearer’s eyes in place of lenses. The cameras scan the field of vision in front of the headset, convert it to digital code and then feed this to a separate computer package. The computer then runs an algorithm developed by the team, that determines the distance and outline of any objects seen. What the cameras scan is displayed on the headset’s screens and information about the objects is conveyed to the wearer by overlaying them with color-coded silhouettes.

“It detects objects and people who move within the visual field that a person with no visual pathologies would have,” said Professor Vergaz, leader of the research team who has developed the “intelligent” goggles. “Very often the patient does not detect them due to problems of contrast. The information regarding depth is what is most missed by patients who use this type of technical aid.”

By , May 30, 2012

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Cocorobo – A Talking, Dog-Watching Robot Vacuum Cleaner from Japan

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Another Roomba coming from Japan – more features (receives up to 30 verbal commands and uses sonar and infrared sensors, 1 hour of continuous performance – don’t know if it is more intelligent) and more expensive (almost 4 times Roomba).

Is it a threat to Roomba?

By Sarah Berlow, May 8, 2012.

Cocorobo’s many gadgets make iRobot’s popular Roomba look like it should be sold alongside Easy Bake ovens. Voice recognition technology enables Cocorobo’s vacuum to respond to greetings or commands — in multiple languages or dialects.  (So far, though, its vocabulary is limited to about 30 phrases, such as “I understand.”)

Cocorobo dances around in reply to commands, resembling the Jetson housekeeper’s friendly compliance. A camera also enables Cocorobo to watch the pet left at home, sending photos via cloud technology to the owner’s iPhone or other smartphone. It can vacuum for up to an hour before requiring a recharge. It does so by linking itself at a port, and has a USB port installed in the vacuum to download updates, such as an expanded vocabulary.

With so much technology heaped onto it, Cocorobo’s vacuuming capability seems almost an afterthought, though Sharp claims it also has an extra-powerful vacuuming system.

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Google moves closer to becoming an Artificial Intelligence Engine

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Are we going to see improvements in our internet search soon?

I was thinking that Google couldn’t change or improve because it was so big, well-established and essentially a monopoly. Perhaps it still can offer new solutions…

by , Thursday, May 17, 2012

Google began rolling out a feature that gives searchers in the United States the potential to access more relevant and in-depth responses to answers without leaving the page. The concept is built on something the company calls “knowledge graph,” which ties together words to create relationships.

There are a multitude of sources behind this data. The search results page displays a variety of content related to keyword queries, bringing up a list of facts, photos, and landmarks, as well as quick links to other popular uses for the search term. Think of a Web beneath the user interface layer of the Internet that ties together all information across the Web.

Rob Garner, vice president of strategy at agency iCrossing, said Google’s knowledge graph takes another step in the company’s long transition to develop an artificial intelligence engine — semantic search. “It’s something Google’s doing in parallel to Schema.org in terms of relating object, places and people,” he said. “Looking at the schema for a person you can actually define the relationship with other people using schema vocabulary.”

For example, someone looking for information on Marie Curie will see her birth and death dates, but also details on her education and scientific discoveries. The search engine understands much more…

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Spherical flying machine developed by the Japanese Department of Defence

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This is the world first Spherical Flying Machine developed by the Research department at the Japan Administrate of Defense:

  • It flies vertically and horizontally, like a humming-bird.
  • It’s unmanned.
  • It can land in any attitude because it’s round
  • It can also move along the ground
  • It can fly 8 minutes continuously, from 0 to 60 Km/h
  • It was build from commercially available parts with a total cost of $1400 USD
  • Applications: rescue and recognizance

Source
Spherical Flying Machine – Watch More Funny Videos