Teresa Escrig

News and oppinion about Cognitive AI & Robotics

Archive for the ‘revolution’ tag

What are the benefits of Artificial Intelligence in Robotics?

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Happy New Year to all!  It’s been a while since my last post. Too busy. Now, I’m back.

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Robotics is not only a research field within artificial intelligence, but a field of application, one where all areas of artificial intelligence can be tested and integrated into a final result.

Amazing humanoid robots exhibit elegant and smooth motion capable of walking, running, and going up and down stairs.  They use their hands to protect themselves when falling, and to get up afterward.  They’re an example of the tremendous financial and human capital that is being devoted to research and development in the field of electronics, control and the design of robots.

Very often, the behavior of these robots contains a fixed number of pre-programmed instructions that are repeated regardless of  any changes in the environment. These robots have no autonomy, nor adaptation, to the changing environment, and therefore do not show intelligent behavior. We are amazed by the technology they provide, which is fantastic! But we can not infer that, because the robots are physically so realistic and the movements so precise and gentle, that they are able to do what we (people) do. Read the rest of this entry »

The rapidly evolving world of robotic technology

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June 25 (Bloomberg) — Stanford University’s Marina Gorbis discusses the rapidly evolving world of robotic technology and how humans will interact with them, and learn from them over the next five to ten years. She interviews with Adam Johnson on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg Rewind.” (Source: Bloomberg)

Marina Gorbis is the Executive Director of Institute for the Future.

Marina’s biography – During her tenture at IFTF, and previously with SRI International, Marina has worked with hundreds of organizations in business, education, government, and philanthropy, bringing a future perspective to improve innovation capacity, develop strategies, and design new products and services. A native of Odessa, Ukraine, Marina is particularly suited to see things from a global perspective. She has worked all over the world and feels equally at home in Silicon Valley, Europe, India, or Kazakhstan. Before becoming IFTF’s Executive Director in 2006, Marina created the Global Innovation Forum, a project comparing innovation strategies in different regions, and she founded Global Ethnographic Network (GEN), a multi-year ethnographic research program aimed at understanding daily lives of people in Brazil, Russia, India, China, and Silicon Valley. She also led IFTF’s Technology Horizons Program, focusing on interaction between technology and social organizations. She has been a guest blogger on BoingBoing.net and writes for IFTF and major media outlets. She is a frequent speaker on future organizational, technology, and social issues. Marina holds a Master’s Degree from the Graduate School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley.

Microsoft’s new sensors: Humantenna and SoundWave

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After the Kinect sensor, Humantenna and SoundWave are two new sensors that Microsoft is working on together with the University of Washington in Seattle.

Humantenna uses the human body as an antenna to pick up the electromagnetic fields — generated by power lines and electrical appliances — found in indoor and outdoor spaces. Users wear a device that measures the signals picked up by the body and transmits them wirelessly to a computer. By studying how the signal changes as users move through the electromagnetic fields, the team was able to program the system to identify 12 gestures, such as a punching motion or a swipe of the hand, with more than 90 percent accuracy.

Humantenna requires users to wear a sensor. They are still working in its robustness.

SoundWave relies on an inaudible tone generated by a laptop’s loudspeaker. When a hand moves in front of the laptop, it changes the frequency of the tone, which the computer’s microphone picks up. By matching characteristic frequency changes with specific hand movements, SoundWave can detect certain gestures with an accuracy of 90 percent or more, even in noisy environments such as a cafeteria.

Human-[robot/computer/machine] interaction can get huge benefits from these two new sensors.

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We need Service Robots to feed disable students

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Dear Teresa, My name is Paul Doyle and I am Head of Access R&D at Hereward College in Coventry. Hereward is a residential college that supports disabled students. We have for some years developed a keen interest in the use of robotics as an assistive technology.

I have been in contact with many providers of robots over the years from the PR2 at Willow Garage to the Care-o-bot by Fraunhofer with little tangible progress. What we have failed to achieve to date is to embed and evaluate an actual device in a real care/living/education environment such as Hereward to see if it actually works and if it is financially viable!

I would like to challenge any robot for example to help with the scenario I posted recently on a Linkedin forum:

Today when I was having lunch in our refectory I observed a number of students (with a variety of physical disabilities) waiting in an orderly queue for a human career to help feed them their lunchtime meal. Due to a shortage of careers some of the students waited for a very long time before a staff member could ask what the student wanted from the menu, picked up the chosen meal from the counter and then fed the student in an appropriate manner (food at the right temperature consistency and rate).
This situation led me to ponder the questions could a robot have helped carry out these tasks to some degree, and bearing in mind the care staff are paid not much over minimum wage, when (if ever) will a robot alternative be a financially viable?”

I would hope manufacturers could see this exposure to a group of users as a development resource, as we have a residential care and education setting where such technologies can be tested in a managed and safe environment.

Many of the young people at Hereward will eventually be the recipients of assistive robot technologies if and when they come online, so hearing what they need/want would I imagine provide a useful insight to product developers.

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Hospitals need robots

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Intelligent robots can be helping in hospitals and at home.

March 6th, 2012 – by Kent Bottles
IBM’s Watson is moving on from conquering “Jeopardy” to aiding health care providers by scanning the entire medical literature to help make diagnoses more accurate. A computer named Dr. Fill is even entered in the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament and expected to do well. Recent articles have speculated on what kind of physicians will soon be replaced by computer programs and robots, and artificial intelligence experts predict that medical diagnoses kiosks will soon be triaging patients in the third world.

Read the article: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/03/06/p4009#more4009

The Service Robotics Revolution

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I have always thought that working at a repetitive task everyday simply for money should not be something that a person does. Life which is meant to be lived to its fullest, becomes an experience of surviving, not an expression of creativity, or fulfillment of every individual’s passion, full potential and purpose.

I have dedicated my entire professional life, almost 20 years of research, to developing a Cognitive Brain, which can be installed in almost any vehicle to transform it into an autonomous robot. One designed to serve individuals, commerce and industry in a variety of ways, without any human intervention. I clearly envisioned this future and had such passion that I created a whole research group to pursue that dream.

What does that future look like? Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Teresa Escrig

March 14th, 2012 at 1:42 am