Teresa Escrig

News and oppinion about Cognitive AI & Robotics

Archive for the ‘vague information’ tag

What are the benefits of Artificial Intelligence in Robotics?

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Happy New Year to all!  It’s been a while since my last post. Too busy. Now, I’m back.

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Robotics is not only a research field within artificial intelligence, but a field of application, one where all areas of artificial intelligence can be tested and integrated into a final result.

Amazing humanoid robots exhibit elegant and smooth motion capable of walking, running, and going up and down stairs.  They use their hands to protect themselves when falling, and to get up afterward.  They’re an example of the tremendous financial and human capital that is being devoted to research and development in the field of electronics, control and the design of robots.

Very often, the behavior of these robots contains a fixed number of pre-programmed instructions that are repeated regardless of  any changes in the environment. These robots have no autonomy, nor adaptation, to the changing environment, and therefore do not show intelligent behavior. We are amazed by the technology they provide, which is fantastic! But we can not infer that, because the robots are physically so realistic and the movements so precise and gentle, that they are able to do what we (people) do. Read the rest of this entry »

ESA tests autonomous rover in Chilean desert ahead of ExoMars mission

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With remote control of rovers on Mars out of the question due to radio signals taking up to 40 minutes to make the round trip to and from the Red Planet, the European Space Agency (ESA) has developed a vehicle that is able to carry out instructions fully autonomously.

With Mars lacking any GPS satellites to help with navigation, the rover must determine how far it has moved relative to its starting point. However, as ESA’s Gianfranco Visentin points out, any errors in this “dead reckoning” method can “build up into risky uncertainties.”

To minimize any uncertainties, the team sought to fix the rover’s position on a map to an accuracy of one meter (3.28 ft). To build a 3D map of its surroundings, assess how far it had traveled and plan the most efficient route to avoid obstacles, Seeker relied on its stereo vision.

“We managed 5.1 km (3.16 miles), somewhat short of our 6 km goal, but an excellent result considering the variety of terrain crossed, changes in lighting conditions experienced and most of all this was ESA’s first large-scale rover test – though definitely not our last.”

“The difficulty comes with follow-on missions, which will require daily traverses of five to ten times longer,” he says. “With longer journeys, the rover progressively loses sense of where it is.”

By , June 19, 2012

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Cognitive Robots is actively seeking working partnerships and investment capital

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My name is Teresa Escrig (TeresaEscrig.com).  I’m the founder and CEO of Cognitive Robots.

We’ve successfully developed the worlds first truly autonomous Cognitive Brain, and have focused our efforts on Service Robotics.

We’re actively seeking both working partnerships and investment capital.

Highlights to-date include:

  • A part of the Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics has been successfully incorporated into a commercial floor scrubber machine, as well as a Pioneer research platform (investment from different sources).
  • Our ‘Manual Assisted Driver’ has been successfully incorporated into forklifts and buses (funded by the Spanish government).
  • We have integrating the Cognitive Brain into our own service robotics platform.  This will be launched in the next few months, and can be used for a variety of applications, including companion, security, marketing, air contamination detection, etc. (funded by Spanish government).
  • The Cognitive Brain is being incorporated into Robosoft’s companion robot Kompai of (funded by a European Project).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’d like further information, we’ve prepared a .pdf document that explains in detail what we have and are offering.

If you are interested, please, contact me at mtescrig@c-robots.com

Kind Regards, Teresa Escrig, PhD, CEO Cognitive Robots

The Intelligence Revolution: Visions of the Future

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Dr. Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist, best-selling author, and popularizer of science. He’s the co-founder of string field theory (a branch of string theory), and continues Einstein’s search to unite the four fundamental forces of nature into one unified theory.

In this incredibly well done movie, he explains how Artificial Intelligence is affecting our lives now.  How our kids are spending more time in virtual worlds, such as “War of World Craft”,  than with their real friends. And how this will affect our lives in the near future.

It is an amazing review, of some of the scientific research that is taking place on the planet, related with Artificial Intelligence.

There is at least one thing that I do not agree with at all: that humans are going to have incorporated into their bodies more robotic parts than human parts in the near future.  To me, this final idea is nonsense.

Artificial Intelligence: time to “invest in soft-robotics”

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The increasingly popular field of soft robotics is set to have an enormous impact on the service and manufacturing industries. … The concept of ‘soft’ in robotics applies to multiple levels: literally soft to the touch – skin, tissue on body surface, muscles, tendons – soft as in natural movements in contrast to manufacturing robots or many walking robots, and soft as in safe interaction with humans. …

And there is no need to be concerned that automation will put people out of work – the reverse is true as jobs that would otherwise be outsourced to China can be protected. …  As John Dulchinos, the chief executive of Adept, the largest US-based manufacturer of industrial robots, argued in a recent interview, the US has lost several million jobs in manufacturing to China because they did not automate their production lines but outsourced them to cheap labor countries.  …  moving people from dull or unhealthy jobs to more interesting ones, according to Foxconn founder and chairman Terry Gou.

We expect soft robotics to have an enormous impact on the service robotics industry because we will share our living space with these machines, and we will closely interact and cooperate with them.

The European Commission is doing an outstanding job at supporting basic research and development in the area of robotics and related fields with the 7th framework programme, and in the future with Horizon 2020. Examples of soft robotics basic projects include ECHORD, the European Clearing House for Open Robotics Development, which has the aim of bringing industry and academia – basic research – together.

Cognitive Robots is leading one of the ECHORD research projects, C-Kompai. The objective of the project is to enhance the companion robot Kompai by Robosoft with the cognitive capabilities provided by the Cognitive Brain for Service Robotics of Cognitive Robots.

Read the full article by professor Rolf Pfeifer (11 April 2012) – deputy director of the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research Robotics and director of the artificial intelligence laboratory at the University of Zurich-: http://www.publicserviceeurope.com/article/1772/time-to-wake-up-and-invest-heavily-in-robotics-technology


UCLA professor wins $250K computing prize for AI

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The technology which has been awarded is similar to the IP developed at Cognitive Robots.

NEW YORK — A University of California, Los Angeles professor is the winner of a $250,000 computing prize for his work in artificial intelligence.

Judea Pearl was named winner of the 2011 A.M. Turing Award on Thursday, one of the most prestigious honors in computing.

Pearl, 75, contributed to the field of artificial intelligence by developing mathematical formulas that factor in uncertainty. That allows computers to find connections between millions of pieces of data, even when the information is incomplete or vague. His work has made it possible for computers to think more like humans, as humans often have to make inferences in decision making.

The award, named after the British mathematician Alan Turing, is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery. Intel (INTC) and Google (GOOG) provide funding.

http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_20182769/ucla-professor-wins-250k-computing-prize-ai?source=email